Game Over will be a panel presentation; attendees will be informed by expert professionals on the developments in the treatment of compulsive behavioural patterns and which studies and outcomes are progressing the field with cutting edge diagnosis, treatment tools and services.

The World Health Organisation defines gaming disorder in the 11th Revision of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11) as a pattern of gaming behaviour (“digital-gaming” or “video-gaming”) characterised by impaired control over gaming, increasing priority given to gaming over other activities to the extent that gaming takes precedence over other interests and daily activities and continuation or escalation of gaming despite the occurrence of negative consequences. For gaming disorder to be diagnosed, the behaviour pattern must be of enough severity to result in significant impairment in personal, family, social, educational, occupational or other important areas of functioning and would normally have been evident for at least 12 months.

Attendees of this presentation will hear a first-hand experience of what it is like living with gaming addiction and how it manifests itself within the family setting.

For gaming disorder to be diagnosed, the behaviour pattern must be of enough severity to result in significant impairment in personal, family, social, educational, occupational or other important areas of functioning and would normally have been evident for at least 12 months.

Ultimately people play games to satisfy their needs; creativity, competing and connection - the captivating attraction towards the fantasy of personalities and identities; explorers, destroyers, achievers and socialisers. Games like World of Warcraft and Fortnite have combinations of those four characters and maybe real hormone triggers for feelings of happiness (Serotonin and Endorphins), love (Oxytocin) and rewards (Dopamine). This high risk – high reward business with a significant influence on our hormone-triggers, is reminiscent to that of the illegal drug business.

Learning Objectives

1. Attendees will be advised on best practice in supporting families affected by gaming addiction, gambling and compulsive behavioural disorders. We must help young people to become responsible human beings coexisting with technology without being ruled by it.
2. This presentation for professionals, parents and carers will explore and identify the key anchors towards starting meaningful conversations and developing early intervention dialogues within the family setting.
3. Attendees will leave with a better understanding as to why gaming is such an infiltrator in the lives of some young people.

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