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Be part of the change: join international experts and passionate campaigners on strategy, policy and change at iCAAD London 2018

03 Apr 2018

The world of Behavioural, Emotional and Mental Health treatment is changing so rapidly it’s hard to keep up. What is happening to drug and alcohol policy, who makes the important decisions to change those policies, what is their strategy - where are the changes headed and what can WE do to influence it?

Here are just a few of the presentations picked from the iCAAD line-up that we believe will give direction to these questions and stimulate conversations and discussions around these important topics.

STEVE MOORE, CLARK FRENCH, GAVIN SATHIANATHAN AND CRISPIN BLUNT MP
MEDICAL CANNABIS IN THE UK

Global drug policy change has slowly shifted the public opinion on cannabis over the years from a dangerous substance to a medicine with a plethora of positive applications. This shift in public opinion not only shows that the industry is growing, but that some countries have enough hindsight and experience to sharpen their policy and o er a market correctly regulated and balanced between the industry’s goals and patients’ needs.
Medical cannabis markets are developing everywhere and this tide of change will inevitably come to the UK. Chaired by Steve Moore, Director of think-tank Volteface, and joined by Clark French, founder of the United Patients Alliance, this session will discuss legalisation of medical cannabis; where we are politically, what the current challenges are, and what the future looks like for UK drug policy, in a rapidly changing global context.

PROFESSOR LARRY PHILLIPS
IMPROVING THE COST-EFFECTIVENESS OF ADDICTION TREATMENT CENTRES.

All addiction treatment centres face the challenge of allocating resources across budget areas to obtain best value for money. This requires a clear sense of priorities that balance costs, risks and bene ts, where bene ts can be any mixture of  nancial and non- nancial value. But how can monetary costs, uncertainty about the future and
multiple, con icting objectives be ‘balanced’ when they are all very di erent? The answer is to be found in multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA), a theoretically sound, highly practical, and well-tested approach that uses both data and human judgement to carry out this balancing act. After a brief introduction to the principles of MCDA, Professor Larry Phillips will facilitate a small group of addiction experts in a decision conference to develop a prioritisation for allocating resources across budget areas of a hypothetical treatment centre. The session will end with a discussion of how this process could be implemented.

MIKE TRACE AND JAC CHARLIER
CRIMINAL JUSTICE DIVERSION INTO DRUG OR ALCOHOL TREATMENT - HOW ARE WE DOING?

For over 20 years, a key UK drug strategy objective has been to identify people with drug problems in police stations, courts and prisons, and encourage them to accept treatment to address their addictive and criminal behaviours. Over the same period in the US, there has been widespread development of Drug Courts that have the same objective. This session will consist of a panel conversation and facilitated discussion between Mike Trace (Former UK Deputy Drug Czar, and current CEO of Forward Trust) and Jac Charlier (Director of PTAC - a US coalition of agencies promoting pre-trial diversion) that addresses the following questions:
• To what extent, with hindsight, were these policies and programmes well implemented.
• Did they achieve their objectives of reducing drug related o ending, and getting more people into recovery?
• Are the current mechanisms for diversion working well? • What should happen next - in the USA and the UK?

DR GORDON MORSE, DR CHRIS FORD, NIAMH EASTWOOD
GLOBAL DRUG POLICY UTOPIA – GROUNDED IN THE PRINCIPLES OF HUMAN RIGHTS, NOT MORAL PANIC

The attempt to control drug use and harms through punitive sanctions (i.e. the war on drugs) has been a global failure. In fact, in many cases it has intensi ed the problem, leading to soaring prison populations, and disproportionately pulling poor, vulnerable or minority communities into the dragnet of the criminal justice system.
Negative perceptions and fears of the general public, reinforced by negative media portrayals, have made drugs and people who use them an ‘easy target’ for politicians and other elected o cials who want to curry favour with their voters.
In this impassioned panel discussion, leading activists from the most in uential groups will explain the reasons such failure was predictable and illustrate how decriminalisation policies (as pursued in other countries such as Portugal and the Netherlands etc) o er a rational and more humane way forward, that also have huge economic and research gains for society.

BECK GEE-COHEN
PRESENTATION ONE: TRANSITIONING IN TREATMENT: UNDERSTANDING GENDER WITH ACTION (FOR THERAPISTS)

More people are feeling safer coming out as transgender than ever before. We are seeing more transgender clients in treatment than ever. So now what? When a client informs us they would like to transition or are in the midst of transitioning when they
come to treatment, we may freeze. We may not know what to do and we may need help. This session is geared toward cisgender clinicians who may be working with transgender clients or will be working with transgender clients in the future. This session will be experiential in nature, will give clinicians a better understanding of themselves as it relates to their transgender clients, and will o er helpful hints to be more prepared and comfortable working with the trans population. If you are ready and willing to get up and experience gender, clinical work, and your own bias, then this is the session for you.
PRESENTATION TWO: TRANSGENDER CLIENTS IN TREATMENT SETTINGS: POLICIES, PROCEDURES, AND PREPARATION
As we are seeing more transgender clients coming into treatment settings, it is important to be prepared. As a facility, it is important to re ect acceptance and a rmation throughout the organisation. In this workshop, executive level sta  will learn how to address policies and procedures that are inclusive of transgender people. We will look in depth at the changes that can be made both immediately and over a period of time. An inclusive organisation ultimately helps the client start a successful journey to recovery.

KATE HALLIDAY
DRUG AND ALCOHOL APPRENTICESHIPS AND BEYOND: KEEPING THE WORKFORCE UP-TO-DATE

This session will look at the latest developments in what may be the greatest change in workforce development, the drug and alcohol worker apprenticeship. With employers designing the standardisation of training for drug and alcohol practitioners we can
hope to see an improvement in the provision of services, the retention of sta  and the encouragement of new talent to the  eld The session will also look at the complexity of providing CPD across the drug and alcohol sector, with each profession having its own demands while needing a consistency of training across the workforce.

MICHAEL ROWLANDS, JULIE NORRIS AND SANDRA PAUL
THERE MAY BE TROUBLE AHEAD

In this session, Julie Norris, Sandra Paul and Michael Rowlands at internationally recognised law  rm Kingsley Napley LLP, will provide an overview of the common legal pitfalls that can occur when treating individuals whose lives are a ected by addiction – for the treating professionals, their clients and their families.
The session will focus on a range of legal issues that may arise in the treatment of addiction, including: dealing with allegations of criminal conduct; its e ects on relationship and family breakdown; ways of protecting assets and wealth; the regulatory and other legal requirements placed on professionals; and practising in a way that safeguards professional as well as personal reputation.

PROFESSOR JOEL BILLIEUX
HOW CAN WE CONCEPTUALIZE BEHAVIORAL ADDICTION WITHOUT PATHOLOGISING COMMON BEHAVIOURS?

Following the recent changes to the diagnostic category for addictive disorders in DSM-5, it is urgent to clarify what constitutes behavioural addiction to have a clear direction for future research and classi cation. However, in the years following the
release of DSM-5, an expanding body of research has increasingly classi ed engagement in a wide range of common behaviours and leisure activities as possible behavioural addiction, resulting in pathologising non-clinically relevant behaviours. In this talk, Professor Billieux will present an operational de nition of behavioural addiction together with a number of exclusion criteria, to avoid pathologising common behaviours.

                                                          

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